Youth Services celebrates Vermont Youth of The Year awardee

Bellows Falls, VT–Alexis Harris, 21, of Bellows Falls has been awarded the Youth of the Year Award by the Vermont Youth Development Program and the Vermont Coalition of Runaway & Homeless Youth Programs (VCRHYP), two state entities that work with community organizations such as Youth Services that serve young people in the state. The award was given this year to five young people in Vermont who have transformed their life in a positive way and has given back to their community while demonstrating resilience.

According to Michelle Sacco, Alexis Harris’ case manager at Youth Services, her client has gone in five years from an angry 16-year-old homeless teenager who had very little support in her life from anyone to being a 21-year-old woman with a 3-year-old daughter who works every day to help others in need.

“If someone needs help, Alexis is the first one to drop everything to be there for them, including employers,” stated Sacco who nominated Harris for the award. “Alexis was working two jobs, 6 days a week, often 12-14 hour days because she is not only a reliable, responsible and committee employee,” explained Sacco, “but she wants to take care of herself and her daughter without any assistance!”

In Bellows Falls, Harris performed a myriad of jobs to help those who come to the Drop In Center: looking for assistance with applying for housing, childcare, Reach UP, transportation, and Medicaid, in addition to filling the food shelves. According to Sacco, Harris started there as a volunteer and was recruited to fill a staff position because of her compassion and commitment to the people she serves.

In her nomination, Sacco recalled last year when Harris became a court-appointed guardian to a 17-year old girl who was facing serious drug charges. Harris took this girl in, gave her a home, made sure she made her court appointments, went to school, met with DCF and probation, got a job, had food and clothing and necessities, and stayed away from drugs and alcohol, according to Sacco.

Sacco marveled that Harris was so mature and responsible and focused that she could not only care for herself and her young daughter, but also this 17-year-old who needed a lot of support and supervision. And yet Harris did this and did it well. “This now 18-year-old is successful in large part from the love and care and commitment of a remarkable young woman who selflessly gave up her home, her time and often her sanity to be sure this young woman could be successful and safe,” testified Sacco.

“In my work with Bellows Falls young people I do see resilience, I do see potential, I do see love and courage,” Sacco explained, “but when I see on top of all that someone give up their time, their home, their independence, and their finances to help a young person in need and do so selflessly and with love and unending patience, I have to step back and smile and marvel and give thanks that I have been fortunate enough to not only know this person, but to have them as part of my life and my community,” enthused Sacco.

This winter Harris came full circle, said Sacco, serving as a Resident Advisor for Youth Services’ Shelter in Bellows Falls, in an unpaid, live-in position that deals with emergencies and day-to -day issues which arise with the shelter’s population of homeless youth.

Youth Services’ Bellows Falls office provides case management for youth ages 16-22; Independent Living Skills support, Shelter and Host Homes, JUMP: Just Us Moms Program, Personal Responsibility Education Program. A Runaway and homeless youth Hotline; Juvenile Diversion, Balance and Restorative Justice; RAMP Career-Focused Mentoring; and the Diaper Bank Collaborative.

For more information, contact Youth Services at (802) 460-0398, visit www.youthservicesinc.org or stop in at 22 Bridge St. in Bellows Falls, VT.

 

Youth Services tackles truancy in Windham County schools

Jocelyn York, BARJ Coordinator at Youth Services

Brattleboro—Youth Services has officially hired Jocelyn York as its Balanced and Restorative Justice (BARJ) Coordinator for the organization, a position she has fulfilled on a temporary basis since last year.  In this program, Youth Services works with youth ages 13 through 22 who have been adjudicated in Family Court, are on probation, are at risk of a truancy filing, have Youthful Offender Status, or require additional support.

According to Youth Services’ Executive Director, Russell Bradbury-Carlin, the agency’s BARJ program recognizes that many young people entering the criminal justice system have underlying factors that might lead to the criminal misconduct.

“Early intervention is key to addressing the reasons that kids aren’t showing up for school or have started to get in trouble with the law.  With early intervention we can reduce the likelihood of future involvement in the justice system.  Sometimes, by offering individual or group coaching in conflict resolution, anger management, and other skills, we can help the young person and their parents turn around the situation,” Bradbury-Carlin explained.

York is an integral part of the School Success Program, a collaboration between Youth Services and Windham Southeast Supervisory Union. The program focuses on truancy intervention for students age 13-18. The program works primarily one-on-one with students, but also includes work with families and other involved community providers.

“Jocelyn works from a different stance that the traditional “Truancy Officer”, Bradbury-Carlin stressed, “acting instead as a supportive helper with a positive, proactive and less punitive approach that builds the necessary skills and understanding needed for student and families to make a long-term commitment to education. She looks at all areas of a student and family’s life that contribute to or can help solve the problem.”

York’s supportive case management focuses on reducing stresses at home that might be related to money or work problems, housing issues, health needs, and/or transportation. She works to identify and develop the skills and interests of the young person.

York explains, “We link youth and their families with other community providers that can meet their needs. By getting my clients involved with other established community supports and activities outside of the school, I can help them reduce their life stressors and focus more clearly on what they need to do to get through school. When necessary, I also may help a student switch to another school or academic program that may better fit their needs than the traditional K-12 system.”

According to Bradbury-Carlin, the outcomes of this collaboration are increased school attendance, improved relationships in family and school, improved life satisfaction and self-esteem, increased parent involvement, and improved access and use of resources.

Before joining Youth Services, York had been a mental health worker on the Brattleboro Retreat’s Adolescent Inpatient Unit, a behavioral interventionist in Barre, Vermont for Washington County Mental Health’s early childhood autism program, and a pre-school teacher in Windsor County. York has bachelor’s degrees in Women’s Studies and Liberal Studies from Sonoma State University in California.

To find out more about Youth Services Restorative Justice programs, call Youth Services at (802) 257-0361 or visit www.youthservicesinc.org

Pre-Trial Program gets boost from skilled coordinator James Arana

James Arana

Youth Services has hired James Arana as Pretrial Services Coordinator for the organization.  This Pretrial Program was first started in 2015 after the passage of Act 195 by the Vermont legislature to address a judicial system overwhelmed by many cases best addressed outside of the courtroom.

According to Youth Services’ Executive Director, Russell Bradbury-Carlin, the agency’s Pretrial Program recognizes that many people entering the criminal justice system have underlying factors that lead to the criminal misconduct.

“It is a voluntary program designed to screen for the presence of substance abuse or mental health issues to inform the criminal justice system about whether alternative paths at rehabilitation may be more effective than the traditional criminal justice system,” Bradbury-Carlin explained.

As Pretrial Services Coordinator, James Arana meets with individuals who choose to participate, and conducts a risk assessment and needs screening. He then shares an interpretive score of the results with the prosecutor’s office and provides the individual with information about resources to help address areas of concern.

“The judge can use those results when determining bail and conditions of release, and the prosecutor can offer defendants the opportunity to participate in a Pre-charge Program that does not involve filing the case with the court,” Arana explained.

Arana is committed to working with the justice system to help people identify the underlying issues in their lives that cause self-destructive and/or criminal behavior, rather than focusing solely on punitive measures. “This program is in alignment with Youth Services decades-long work in restorative justice, which focuses on repairing harm caused by crime and dealing with the risks and needs of the person who commit crimes,” stated Arana.

Arana consults with numerous other organizations, regional, national, and international. He is Senior Consultant and Trainer for MERGE for Gender Equality, Inc., where he focuses internationally, on training men and women to work as allies in gender-based and family violence prevention. He is also Director of Youth Programing and Training for The Performance Project and the First Generation youth program in Western Massachusetts. He was co-founder of Men’s Resources International, and served as associate director for ten years.

Arana worked as a prevention specialist and Program Director for Cooley Dickinson Hospital in Western Massachusetts. “James many years working directly with young adults struggling with anger and addiction issues give him great insight into the clients in our pre-trial program,” explained Bradbury-Carlin. “We are thrilled to have such a seasoned social worker in our ranks.”

For more information on Youth Services Restorative Justice programs or to support these efforts with a donation, visit youthservicesinc.org or call (802) 257-0361.

VT Diaper Bank was launched in 2016 in Bellows Falls

Bellows Falls, VT—Parks Place and Youth Services are collaborating to launch, “Time for a Change”, Vermont’s first diaper bank to meet the needs of families with young children in Windham County who cannot afford diapers.

Various locations throughout the greater Bellows Falls area will have bins starting in November to collect donated diapers and wipes: committed so far are Lisais Market in Bellows Falls, Family Dollar and Discount Foods Warehouse in Walpole and The Rockingham Library. More bin locations throughout Windham County are sought and community groups such as churches and clubs are encouraged to help raise funds or diaper donations.

As part of the bank’s inauguration on November 10, there was what is being coined a  “Diaper Dump” collection at Dairy Joy in Bellows Falls. Organizers hoped to fill an entire dump truck with diaper and wipes donations to launch the diaper bank.

According to national estimates, a typical infant will require an average of 50-60 diaper changes a week. That is approximately 2,600 diapers a year at an annual cost to their family of close to $1000.

A recent Feeding America study found that 32 percent of low-income families surveyed reported reusing disposable diapers, while 48 percent reported delaying changing a diaper to make their supply last longer. Studies show that babies experience increased health issues such as diaper rashes and urinary tract infections from limited diaper changes.

Michelle Sacco, Youth Services’ Greater Falls Transitional Living Program manager, cited the many young mothers she works with as often having to choose between diapers and other basic necessities like electricity, food or heat because they can’t afford all three.  “

Youth Services and Parks Place are spearheading this initiative with community partners, United Way of Windham County, WNESU, Building Bright Futures, Our Place Drop In, SEVCA and others playing important collaborative roles, explained Sacco. The diaper bank will be housed at Parks Place with Youth Services’ Just Us Moms Program (JUMP) helping to distribute the donated items.

For more information, contact parksplacevt.org or info@youthservicesinc.org.

New Substance Abuse Treatment Gets Boost from Governor and Subaru of New England

rosie-at-podium
Pictured here are Governor Peter Shumlin, Ernie Boch Jr, President & CEO of Subaru of New England and Rosie Nevins-Alderfer at the podium representing Youth Services.

STOWE-With the endorsement of Governor Peter Shumlin, Subaru of New England donated $25,000 to Youth Services to help the nonprofit develop an innovative youth counseling program to treat addiction.

“Once again I stand here thanking Ernie Boch Jr. and Subaru of New England for a generous donation to tackle an issue here in Vermont,” Gov. Shumlin said, noting that Boch has donated to Irene Recovery efforts, Green Up Day and the Vermont Universal Children’s Higher Education Savings Account Program. It marks his second donation to combating opiate addiction in Vermont, following last year’s commitment to Recovery House Inc. in Rutland.

“Drug abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our state and the nation,” Gov. Shumlin said. “Today’s donation to Youth Services will help us reach kids with counseling and treatment to help them turn their lives around.”

“Opiate addiction is a serious public health problem with terrible consequences. The support and treatment that Youth Services provides for young people in Vermont is crucial and life-saving. On behalf of Subaru of New England, I’m here today with a check for Youth Services for $25,000 dollars to help fight this battle,” stated Ernie Boch Jr.

Youth Services is a private non-profit founded in 1972 to provide prevention, intervention and development programs for young people and families in Windham County communities, regardless of ability to pay.

The organization is launching a new Youth Substance Abuse Treatment Program, which is cited as one of the most pressing needs in Windham County. “We very much appreciate the support of Governor’s Shumlin in facilitating this donation and the generous support of Subaru of New England for helping us launch this critical endeavor,” explained Russell Bradbury-Carlin, Youth Services’ Executive Director.

“Young people face a lot of hurdles that prevent them from seeking treatment, including intense peer-pressure and lack of parental support,” said Bradbury-Carlin. He said Youth Services will be hiring a licensed therapist who will spend part of their time out of the office and in the community.

“Our new therapist being able to travel is key because many of the folks we work with struggle with lack of transportation and isolation from other services and connections,” explained Rosie Nevins-Alderfer during her acceptance of the check for Youth Services.

Youth Services has been doing street outreach, case management, and work with court-involved youth for 40+ years—so the youth we already work with are some of the folks that will benefit most greatly from having a clinician dedicated to substance abuse on board, according to Nevins-Alderfer.  “Our peer outreach workers (former clients who are now staff) will be critical in connecting our new addiction and recovery counselor with youth we would not otherwise be able to serve,” Nevins-Alderfer said.

The peer outreach model is evidence-based and has a long history of success in homelessness, housing and addiction support nationwide. “We are excited to employ it here as one of our many strategies to meet youth where they are at,” Nevins-Alderfer explained.

 

 

 

Youth Services provides agricultural employment for at-risk youth in Bellows Falls

Bellows Falls—Youth Services provided a seven-week summer work program for low income youth in the Bellows Falls area from August 1 to Sept 15. According to organizers, twelve youth between the ages of 14-24 benefited from paid summer jobs in agriculture as well as gained important life skills that better prepare them for entering the workforce and living independently. More than two- thirds of the participants had already left high school.

“Thanks to Department of Labor funding, we were pleased to be able to offer this much-needed program for an eighth year,” said Russell Bradbury-Carlin, the Executive Director for Youth Services, noting that employment and job development skills were two of the highest needs of the youth his agency serves.

The participants worked and learned at a variety of sites each morning, shared a nutritious lunch together, and studied life and employment skills afternoons at the Health Center at Bellows Falls under the guidance and support of two adult supervisors and a Youth Services workforce development coordinator. The young adults participated in workshops on occupational safety, financial management, reproductive health, resume writing and job readiness skills.

While the youth learned skills they made important contributions to the area.  Divided into two teams, they did agricultural work at Kurn Hattin Homes, Harlow Farm, Westminster Central School garden and the Hope Roots Farm of Bianca and Mike Zaransky.  They also maintained the gardens at Bellows Falls Union High School until the students returned. All their hosts indicated that they appreciated the contributions of Youth Services’ participants.

“It is an opportunity to give them a taste of the workday world while still providing them with support,” explained Susan Lawson-Kelleher, Youth Services Workforce Development Coordinator. At the completion of the program, over half of the out-of-school participants were offered and accepted full or part-time positions,” Lawson-Kelleher explained. Another accepted a job offer partway through the program.

For more information about Youth Services programs in the greater Bellows Falls area, contact Case Manager Michelle Sacco at Youth Services’ Parks Place office at (802) 275-7871 or Workforce Development Coordinator, Susan Lawson-Kelleher at (802) 257-0361 or visit www.youthservicesinc.org.

BrattRock Youth Rock Festival a huge success: plans underway for next year

Fourteen area youth rock bands and solo artists took the stage at 118 Elliot in downtown Brattleboro, Vermont on Saturday, October 1 for the first ever Brattleboro Youth Rock Festival (BrattRock 2016). Performances took place on two stages, one indoor and one outdoor, between 5:00 and 10:00 PM. Gates opened at 4:30 PM. Advance tickets were available online via the BrattRock website at www.brattrock.org. Prices were $8 adults/$6 students in advance and $10 adults /$8 students at the door. Proceeds from the event will benefit Youth Services. The public was invited to attend this family-friendly event.

The goal of BrattRock is to provide a venue for youth musicians from Brattleboro and the surrounding region to connect, learn, perform, inspire, and be inspired. Participation is open to solo performers or bands with all members under 20 years of age. Registration will begin again next spring with performers submitting online applications and sample performance videos.

BrattRock’s organizing committee was proud to present the final performer line-up for BrattRock 2016: From Brattleboro and surrounding towns: Impending Exorcism, The Faints, Negative Space Nomad vs.Settler, Oak Grove Blues Band, and Sophie Waters. From Western Massachusetts: Cape Fournier, Cosmic Duct Tape, Felixis Jinx, Kalliope Jones, Raspberry Jam, and Rool Bunk. From Hinsdale, New Hampshire: Zebulon Hildreth. A full bio of each band is available on the BrattRock web page and Facebook page.

In addition to musical performances, the festival featured hands-on music workshops for participating youth musicians, which were offered by area music professionals and educators Wyatt Andrews, Aaron Chesley, Samirah Evans, Matt Hall, June Millington, Kevin Parry, Dan Seiden, and Peter Siegel.

Planning for BrattRock was  underway for the past year. The idea for the event was born after last year’s Youth Services Battle of the Bands in Brattleboro when some parents of participating musicians proposed a similar youth-oriented event minus the competition aspect. Executive Director, Russell Bradbury-Carlin approved the plan for Youth Services to act as BrattRock’s fiscal sponsor, allowing festival organizers to raise funds under Youth Services’ non-profit status.

To date, BrattRock has received grant funding from the Vermont Arts Council and the Vermont Community Foundation, and sponsors include Guilford Sound, Youth Services, the Brattleboro Music Center, WKVT, C&S Wholesale Grocers, 118 Elliot, Oak Meadow, Hilltop Montessori, the Brattleboro Retreat, and Rouleau-Holley’s Tae Kwon Do.

Co-founder and organizer Jaimie Scanlon said of the event, “We so everyone who came out on October 1 to honor and celebrate the many talented kids that gathered in Brattleboro, as well as to support all the great things that Youth Services does. The bands are all amazing and the kids were all so pumped to perform. The level of entertainment was extreme.”

Executive Director shared wisdom at national ‘Youth Think Tank’

Youth Services Executive Director Contributed to National Think Tank

Washington, DC—Russell Bradbury-Carlin, Youth Services’ Executive Director joined a think tank Sept 22-23 in Washington. DC organized by MANY, a national network that engages stakeholders across sectors to strengthen outcomes for youth and young adults at highest risk for victimization and/or delinquency.

According to Megan Blondin, Executive Director of MANY, the purpose of this convening was for the select group of leaders and experts to assess emerging and persistent trends, their impact on the youth services field, and identify effective local and national strategies to strengthen outcomes for youth.

“I appreciated the opportunity to reflect on and share my experiences, observations, concerns and ideas about trends we’re seeing in Windham Country with the young people we serve,” said Youth Services’ Bradbury-Carlin. “I was able to share some of the successes and innovations we’ve had to date and leave with a wealth of new information, ideas and professional contacts. I am honored to have had this opportunity,” he stated.

For more information on Youth Services and its programs, visit youthservicesinc.org or call (802) 257-0361.

Annual golf torney had strongest turnout in decade this year

Savings Bank of Walpole teamFundraisingProgramNews

A very strong turn out by local golfers —116 in all — and strong corporate support, made Youth Services’ 31st Annual Golf Tournament a rousing success, generated over $20,000 to help underwrite the agency’s programs. The tournament was held at the Brattleboro Country Club on July 27, a warm 90 degree clear day. This was one of the highest turnouts since 2003, according to Russell Bradbury-Carlin, Youth Services executive director.

The team of Paul LaCoste, Mike Pacheco, Spencer Clason and Todd Waterman from H&R Block/Targett Ledgers won First Gross, with the Savings Bank of Walpole team of Steve Bianco, Gregg Tewksbury, Rick Wisell and Jason Kelley finishing First Net.

The Brattleboro Subaru Ford team of John Mundorf, Kevin Curtis, Ed Winseck and Manny Metaxes took Second Gross with the Brattleboro Savings & Loan team of Hugh Barber, Bill Crowley, George Roberge and Tammy Bischoff taking Second Net.

Allison Barber won the prize for the Women’s Longest Drive. Tracy Sloan took Women’s Closest to the Line with Kate McGinn winning the prize for Women’s Closest to the Pin.

In the Men’s Division, John Mundorf took the prize for Men’s Longest Drive. Dave Anderson took Men’s Closest to the Line with Jason Canaday winning Men’s Closest to Pin.

Youth Services’ Board member Rick Hashagen together with his grandson, Joshua Nordheim, ran a Putting Contest which raised $275 for the agency.  The winner of the Putting Contest was Guy Lindholm.

For the third year in a row, there was a silent auction and over 40 items and services were raffled thanks to the generosity of local businesses who has supported the fundraiser with gifts in kind.

A special feature was the 4th year Helicopter Golf Ball Drop thanks to the Renaud Bros, Inc. helicopter, piloted by Mike Renaud and assisted by his wife, Shirley. Individuals did not need to be part of the tournament to buy golf balls, priced at $100 each, nor be present at the drop to win. Buckets of golf balls were dropped from 20 feet on the fairway at the Brattleboro Country Club, with the winner of the $3000 cash prize being Lynn Herzog of Brattleboro, VT.  Bob Lyons of Newfane, VT, whose ball landed furthest from the pin won the 10-minute helicopter ride.

Pacesetters Sponsors are G.S. Precision; Brattleboro Ford Subaru; The Richards Group and TransCanada. Presenter Sponsors are People’s United Bank. Sustaining Sponsors are Brattleboro Savings & Loan; Chroma Technology; Edward Jones Investments; H & R Block; River Valley Credit Union; Swiss Precision Turning; Twombly Wealth Management; and Vermont Country Deli. Patron Sponsors are BAST Co; Brattleboro Retreat; C.E. Bradley Laboratories; David Manning Inc.; Trust Company of Vermont; Rolls Royce Nuclear; Savings Bank of Walpole; and VSECU. Associate Sponsors are Cota & Cota Oil Co. Parks Place Financial Advisors; and W.W. Building Supply.

All proceeds from the tournament helps support Youth Services’ programs.  Now celebrating its 44th year helping local families thrive, Youth Services transforms lives and inspires futures of more than 1500 local young people and families each year.

For more information or to get involved in Youth Services, call (802) 257-0361 or visit www.youthservicesinc.org