Monthly Archives: September 2016

New Substance Abuse Treatment Gets Boost from Governor and Subaru of New England

rosie-at-podium
Pictured here are Governor Peter Shumlin, Ernie Boch Jr, President & CEO of Subaru of New England and Rosie Nevins-Alderfer at the podium representing Youth Services.

STOWE-With the endorsement of Governor Peter Shumlin, Subaru of New England donated $25,000 to Youth Services to help the nonprofit develop an innovative youth counseling program to treat addiction.

“Once again I stand here thanking Ernie Boch Jr. and Subaru of New England for a generous donation to tackle an issue here in Vermont,” Gov. Shumlin said, noting that Boch has donated to Irene Recovery efforts, Green Up Day and the Vermont Universal Children’s Higher Education Savings Account Program. It marks his second donation to combating opiate addiction in Vermont, following last year’s commitment to Recovery House Inc. in Rutland.

“Drug abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our state and the nation,” Gov. Shumlin said. “Today’s donation to Youth Services will help us reach kids with counseling and treatment to help them turn their lives around.”

“Opiate addiction is a serious public health problem with terrible consequences. The support and treatment that Youth Services provides for young people in Vermont is crucial and life-saving. On behalf of Subaru of New England, I’m here today with a check for Youth Services for $25,000 dollars to help fight this battle,” stated Ernie Boch Jr.

Youth Services is a private non-profit founded in 1972 to provide prevention, intervention and development programs for young people and families in Windham County communities, regardless of ability to pay.

The organization is launching a new Youth Substance Abuse Treatment Program, which is cited as one of the most pressing needs in Windham County. “We very much appreciate the support of Governor’s Shumlin in facilitating this donation and the generous support of Subaru of New England for helping us launch this critical endeavor,” explained Russell Bradbury-Carlin, Youth Services’ Executive Director.

“Young people face a lot of hurdles that prevent them from seeking treatment, including intense peer-pressure and lack of parental support,” said Bradbury-Carlin. He said Youth Services will be hiring a licensed therapist who will spend part of their time out of the office and in the community.

“Our new therapist being able to travel is key because many of the folks we work with struggle with lack of transportation and isolation from other services and connections,” explained Rosie Nevins-Alderfer during her acceptance of the check for Youth Services.

Youth Services has been doing street outreach, case management, and work with court-involved youth for 40+ years—so the youth we already work with are some of the folks that will benefit most greatly from having a clinician dedicated to substance abuse on board, according to Nevins-Alderfer.  “Our peer outreach workers (former clients who are now staff) will be critical in connecting our new addiction and recovery counselor with youth we would not otherwise be able to serve,” Nevins-Alderfer said.

The peer outreach model is evidence-based and has a long history of success in homelessness, housing and addiction support nationwide. “We are excited to employ it here as one of our many strategies to meet youth where they are at,” Nevins-Alderfer explained.

 

 

 

Youth Services provides agricultural employment for at-risk youth in Bellows Falls

Bellows Falls—Youth Services provided a seven-week summer work program for low income youth in the Bellows Falls area from August 1 to Sept 15. According to organizers, twelve youth between the ages of 14-24 benefited from paid summer jobs in agriculture as well as gained important life skills that better prepare them for entering the workforce and living independently. More than two- thirds of the participants had already left high school.

“Thanks to Department of Labor funding, we were pleased to be able to offer this much-needed program for an eighth year,” said Russell Bradbury-Carlin, the Executive Director for Youth Services, noting that employment and job development skills were two of the highest needs of the youth his agency serves.

The participants worked and learned at a variety of sites each morning, shared a nutritious lunch together, and studied life and employment skills afternoons at the Health Center at Bellows Falls under the guidance and support of two adult supervisors and a Youth Services workforce development coordinator. The young adults participated in workshops on occupational safety, financial management, reproductive health, resume writing and job readiness skills.

While the youth learned skills they made important contributions to the area.  Divided into two teams, they did agricultural work at Kurn Hattin Homes, Harlow Farm, Westminster Central School garden and the Hope Roots Farm of Bianca and Mike Zaransky.  They also maintained the gardens at Bellows Falls Union High School until the students returned. All their hosts indicated that they appreciated the contributions of Youth Services’ participants.

“It is an opportunity to give them a taste of the workday world while still providing them with support,” explained Susan Lawson-Kelleher, Youth Services Workforce Development Coordinator. At the completion of the program, over half of the out-of-school participants were offered and accepted full or part-time positions,” Lawson-Kelleher explained. Another accepted a job offer partway through the program.

For more information about Youth Services programs in the greater Bellows Falls area, contact Case Manager Michelle Sacco at Youth Services’ Parks Place office at (802) 275-7871 or Workforce Development Coordinator, Susan Lawson-Kelleher at (802) 257-0361 or visit www.youthservicesinc.org.

BrattRock Youth Rock Festival a huge success: plans underway for next year

Fourteen area youth rock bands and solo artists took the stage at 118 Elliot in downtown Brattleboro, Vermont on Saturday, October 1 for the first ever Brattleboro Youth Rock Festival (BrattRock 2016). Performances took place on two stages, one indoor and one outdoor, between 5:00 and 10:00 PM. Gates opened at 4:30 PM. Advance tickets were available online via the BrattRock website at www.brattrock.org. Prices were $8 adults/$6 students in advance and $10 adults /$8 students at the door. Proceeds from the event will benefit Youth Services. The public was invited to attend this family-friendly event.

The goal of BrattRock is to provide a venue for youth musicians from Brattleboro and the surrounding region to connect, learn, perform, inspire, and be inspired. Participation is open to solo performers or bands with all members under 20 years of age. Registration will begin again next spring with performers submitting online applications and sample performance videos.

BrattRock’s organizing committee was proud to present the final performer line-up for BrattRock 2016: From Brattleboro and surrounding towns: Impending Exorcism, The Faints, Negative Space Nomad vs.Settler, Oak Grove Blues Band, and Sophie Waters. From Western Massachusetts: Cape Fournier, Cosmic Duct Tape, Felixis Jinx, Kalliope Jones, Raspberry Jam, and Rool Bunk. From Hinsdale, New Hampshire: Zebulon Hildreth. A full bio of each band is available on the BrattRock web page and Facebook page.

In addition to musical performances, the festival featured hands-on music workshops for participating youth musicians, which were offered by area music professionals and educators Wyatt Andrews, Aaron Chesley, Samirah Evans, Matt Hall, June Millington, Kevin Parry, Dan Seiden, and Peter Siegel.

Planning for BrattRock was  underway for the past year. The idea for the event was born after last year’s Youth Services Battle of the Bands in Brattleboro when some parents of participating musicians proposed a similar youth-oriented event minus the competition aspect. Executive Director, Russell Bradbury-Carlin approved the plan for Youth Services to act as BrattRock’s fiscal sponsor, allowing festival organizers to raise funds under Youth Services’ non-profit status.

To date, BrattRock has received grant funding from the Vermont Arts Council and the Vermont Community Foundation, and sponsors include Guilford Sound, Youth Services, the Brattleboro Music Center, WKVT, C&S Wholesale Grocers, 118 Elliot, Oak Meadow, Hilltop Montessori, the Brattleboro Retreat, and Rouleau-Holley’s Tae Kwon Do.

Co-founder and organizer Jaimie Scanlon said of the event, “We so everyone who came out on October 1 to honor and celebrate the many talented kids that gathered in Brattleboro, as well as to support all the great things that Youth Services does. The bands are all amazing and the kids were all so pumped to perform. The level of entertainment was extreme.”

Executive Director shared wisdom at national ‘Youth Think Tank’

Youth Services Executive Director Contributed to National Think Tank

Washington, DC—Russell Bradbury-Carlin, Youth Services’ Executive Director joined a think tank Sept 22-23 in Washington. DC organized by MANY, a national network that engages stakeholders across sectors to strengthen outcomes for youth and young adults at highest risk for victimization and/or delinquency.

According to Megan Blondin, Executive Director of MANY, the purpose of this convening was for the select group of leaders and experts to assess emerging and persistent trends, their impact on the youth services field, and identify effective local and national strategies to strengthen outcomes for youth.

“I appreciated the opportunity to reflect on and share my experiences, observations, concerns and ideas about trends we’re seeing in Windham Country with the young people we serve,” said Youth Services’ Bradbury-Carlin. “I was able to share some of the successes and innovations we’ve had to date and leave with a wealth of new information, ideas and professional contacts. I am honored to have had this opportunity,” he stated.

For more information on Youth Services and its programs, visit youthservicesinc.org or call (802) 257-0361.